The Fall

PHOTO PROMPT © Brenda Cox

I had stayed overnight at my daughter’s after babysitting late into the night. But I couldn’t rest.

Finally, around 5:30 or 6, I got up, dressed, and quietly left for home.

Our front door was open, but something was off kilter. I noticed the ladder lying flat in front of the garage. Panicked, I parked and ran into the house.

Terry sat in a straight chair with his left leg propped up on another. At the hospital, we learned he had crushed his heel bone.

That was the year of hurricane Sandy. A life-changing Fall.

________________

(Every word is true–no fiction this week. That uprooted tree brought this memory back in an instant. Terry was 69 then, and he’s 78 now. The pain is unrelenting. If you have to climb a ladder, don’t do it when no one else is there to steady the ladder for you. A neighbor heard the clatter and came to see if she could help. We are so thankful that she was there for him until I got home. Isn’t it interesting how closely attuned we become in a long, GOOD marriage! I didn’t know why I was restless and unable to sleep. I just knew I needed to get home!)

57 thoughts on “The Fall

    1. Mason, it’s been nine years, and the pain is ever-present. The doctor waited a couple of weeks for the swelling to go down, then went in and patched up all the little pieces of bone with plates and screws. Don’t EVER fall off a ladder and break your heel! It’s a life-changing injury.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. It was about 5 feet, which doesn’t seem so bad, but he landed hard on his left heel, crushing the bones. He said when he tried to stand up, it felt like jello. It’s been a life-changing injury.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Dear Linda,

    A woman’s intuition is a gift, isn’t it?
    I have only one issue. I found the segue between your leaving your daughter’s house and coming home confusing. And I didn’t know exactly who Terry was at first. Perhaps something like “I dressed at 5:30 and went home.”
    I know the word constraint makes it a challenge.
    Still a good story and yes we both wrote about personal disasters. I worry as my husband is getting on in years that he doesn’t realize he’s not a young man anymore.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Same here, Rochelle. Terry is now 78, but still thinks he’s 30something 🙂

      I went back and read it again, and you’re right. I had to edit the story down from over 130 words, and dropped that piece in the process. I’m going to fix it 🙂

      Like

  2. Linda,
    Glad it wasn’t worse but sorry Terry has to suffer the unrelenting pain from that fall. Nicely told account of the incident. Thank God for the bond that connects soulmates: it’s uncanny.
    pax,
    dora

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Well, he recovered, Michael, but he is always in pain. His heel is full of plates and screws, and of course arthritis has developed in that foot. He’s tough, though. Like the Energizer Bunny 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. We just got the outside arms, and that was intense. I can’t imagine being coser to the eye of that storm. Our whole neighborhood was humming with generators while we waited for the power to come back on. The best thing about it was the way our neighbors helped each other, checked on each other, and especially kept an eye on Terry. Too bad if it takes a hurricane to help us do that!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. First time we’d heard of it, too. But when the ER doctor came back to us with his x-rays, her face was very solemn. That was our first clue that this was more serious than we’d thought.

      Like

  3. Wow, it really is incredible that you could sense that something bad had happened from so far away. You two must truly be connected in your happy marriage. Thankfully that neighbour was there. True, good advice – never use a ladder without someone else there to steady it.

    Liked by 1 person

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