Better than Sliced!

Most of us have heard the saying, “That’s the best thing since sliced bread!” What do you think is actually the best thing since sliced bread?

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Easy.  Learning to make my own bread.

Slicing it is pure pleasure.

I’ve been making bread for 45 years.  I learned by watching my mom bake bread for the years I was in high school, when she was a stay-at-home preacher’s wife living on a shoestring salary.  She grew up during the Depression, and she still had all the skills of penny-stretching that she had learned as a kid.

Her bread filled the house with its perfume on baking day. I especially loved it when she took one batch of dough and turned it into sweet rolls instead of a loaf. Raisins, sugar, cinnamon and a light glaze for frosting. Hoo boy.

So when I got married, I  started baking bread.  Trial and error for sure, and Mom and Dad had moved away so I couldn’t tap into her experience. It wasn’t long before I was producing beautiful golden loaves, and I’ve been doing so ever since.  When all four of our kids were home, I baked eight loaves every Saturday. By hand. Kneading it by hand was my only option, until once I hurt my back and couldn’t do it.

Terry stepped up in his manly- man way and said he’d do it.  After that we went out and got a good mixer with a dough hook, and that’s what I’ve used for many years now.  No bread machine, at least not yet.

Isn’t slicing it a pain? Good heavens NO.  It takes a nanosecond, and the benefits are countless.  Flavor, texture (it doesn’t rip apart when you spread peanut butter on it ) nutrition (count the chemicals in store-bought) because I use unbleached, unenriched flours. Variety, because I bake more than just your basic white bread. In fact, I rarely make white bread these days. 

Sliced bread introduced an era of a soft, mooshy, bad-tasting product that doesn’t deserve to be called bread.

If we had tried to slice it at home, it would have smooshed down into a wad of dough.

You can slice the stuff I make without squashing it.

Isn’t that a better thing?

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/sliced-bread/

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16 thoughts on “Better than Sliced!

  1. I went through a phase of trying to make the perfect baguette a few years ago, but I rarely make homemade bread anymore. Maybe this weekend now that you’ve inspired me. Oh and those cinnamon rolls! My mom used to make those, too. I make them for Thanksgiving morning, but instead of glaze I brush each one with just a touch of honey.

    1. Honey! What a good idea! I went through a period of fooling around with French, Italian, etc in bread-baking, and it’s fun and I still do it now and then. But mostly I like bread for toasting and for sandwiches, so I tend to stick to the old standard–for us, that’s whole wheat bread made with no white flour at all.

  2. There is nothing better than a slice of fresh out of the oven, still warm bread with some butter! I’ve been baking our bread for years now. I use spelt flour as I have folks in the house allergic to wheat. Hubby’s favorite is the cinnamon raisin version I make. Your post made me smile. 🙂

      1. Spelt bread has some gluten in it (much less than wheat). Because the allergy in our house is wheat, not gluten I’ve been able to use spelt flour as the substitute for wheat. I use gluten alternative flours for some of my finer baking, like the brownies I make.

    1. It’s simple in the process, but you have to figure out things like room temperature, humidity, and so on. I’ve had some colossal failures, but it’s been a long time since that happened. Takes practice and patience, but the results are SO rewarding!

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